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SAFETY

Boxed WARNINGS and Additional Important Safety Information

  • Herceptin administration can result in sub-clinical and clinical cardiac failure. The incidence and severity was highest in patients receiving Herceptin with anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens. In a pivotal adjuvant trial, one patient who developed CHF died of cardiomyopathy
  • Evaluate left ventricular function in all patients prior to and during treatment with Herceptin. Discontinue Herceptin treatment in patients receiving adjuvant therapy and withhold Herceptin in patients with metastatic disease for clinically significant decrease in left ventricular function
  • Herceptin administration can result in serious and fatal infusion reactions and pulmonary toxicity. Symptoms usually occur during or within 24 hours of Herceptin administration. Interrupt Herceptin infusion for dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Monitor patients until symptoms completely resolve. Discontinue Herceptin for anaphylaxis, angioedema, interstitial pneumonitis, or acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • Exposure to Herceptin during pregnancy can result in oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios sequence manifesting as pulmonary hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities, and neonatal death. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception
  • Exacerbation of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia has also occurred
  • Detection of HER2 protein overexpression is necessary for selection of patients appropriate for Herceptin therapy
  • The most common adverse reactions associated with Herceptin in breast cancer were fever, nausea, vomiting, infusion reactions, diarrhea, infections, increased cough, headache, fatigue, dyspnea, rash, neutropenia, anemia, and myalgia
  • The most common adverse reactions associated with Herceptin in metastatic gastric cancer were neutropenia, diarrhea, fatigue, anemia, stomatitis, weight loss, upper respiratory tract infections, fever, thrombocytopenia, mucosal inflammation, nasopharyngitis, and dysgeusia

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see additional select Important Safety Information throughout, and the accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS.

Safety First! Before you start exploring, take the time to read the Important Safety Information. Roll over to read more.

Resources

This section provides links to relevant websites that will help you expand your knowledge about HER2+ breast cancer and gain access to additional information that you may find useful in your practice.

Unless otherwise indicated, Genentech, Inc. is neither affiliated with nor endorses any of the following organizations.

The following lists of associations, societies, medical databases, and additional resources are not intended to be all-inclusive, but are a representative sampling of information sources:


Associations and Societies

American Medical Association (AMA)

The nation's leader in promoting professionalism in medicine, setting standards for medical education and ethics, and advancing the betterment of public health.


American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

A nonprofit organization that supports various types of cancer research, in particular, patient-oriented clinical research.


National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), an alliance of 19 of the world's leading cancer centers, is an authoritative source of information to help patients and health professionals make informed decisions about cancer care.


Oncology Nursing Society (ONS)

A professional organization of more than 30,000 registered nurses and other healthcare providers dedicated to excellence in patient care, education, research, and administration in oncology nursing. The overall mission of ONS is to promote excellence in oncology nursing and quality cancer care.


San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS)

The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) is a division of Cancer Therapy & Research Center (CTRC). The CTRC is an independent, nonprofit institution directed by a volunteer Board of Governors committed to providing the highest-quality cancer treatment, research, and education.


Medical Databases

MEDLINE/PubMed

A service of the National Library of Medicine that provides access to over 24 million citations from MEDLINE and additional life science journals, and includes links to additional sites that provide full-text articles and other related resources.


Genentech Resources

Authorized Herceptin Distributors

For Authorized Distributor information, please go to:


Herceptin Access Solutions provides reliable, effective access and reimbursement services to assist your patients and practice.

  • Full benefits investigations (BIs) to confirm coverage
  • Assistance with prior authorizations (PAs)
  • Billing and coding information
  • Guidance with appeals
  • Co-pay assistance programs to help eligible insured patients with out-of-pocket costs
  • Free medicine for qualified uninsured and underinsured patients through the Genentech® Access to Care Foundation (GATCF)

Herceptin Access Solutions offers a full range of access and reimbursement support for your practice and patients.

Visit Genentech-Access.com/Herceptin to learn more about our programs and services. To speak with one of our dedicated Specialists, call (866) 422-2377


Genentech BioOncology Co-Pay Card

This program helps eligible patients with out-of-pocket costs for Herceptin.

If you want to enroll your patients or have any questions, call 855-MYCOPAY (855-692-6729) 9 AM-8 PM EST, Monday-Friday or visit www.copayassistancenow.com


The HERConnection Program

The Genentech HERConnection Patient Support Program is about supporting women with HER2+ breast cancer. It provides valuable resources for your patients. To sign up for HERConnection, patients can visit www.HERconnection.com


Genentech BioOncology

Offers detailed information about Genentech Oncology products and research.


Additional Resources

Medscape

Medscape's mission is to provide clinicians and other healthcare professionals with timely clinical information that is relevant to your patients and practice. After registering for free, Medscape automatically delivers specialty content to you that best fits your profile.


National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Sponsored by the US government, this organization leads the nation's fight against cancer by supporting cancer research and promoting treatment, prevention, and quality of care for patients and their families.


OncoLink

A professional organization that provides information about specific types of cancer, updates on cancer treatments, and news about research advances.


ClinicalTrials.gov

Provides regularly updated information about federally and privately supported clinical research in human volunteers.

Indications

Adjuvant Breast Cancer

Herceptin is indicated for adjuvant treatment of HER2-overexpressing node-positive or node-negative (ER/PR-negative or with one high-risk feature*) breast cancer:

  • As part of a treatment regimen containing doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and either paclitaxel or docetaxel
  • With docetaxel and carboplatin
  • As a single agent following multi-modality anthracycline-based therapy

* High-risk is defined as ER/PR positive with one of the following features: tumor size >2 cm, age <35 years, or tumor grade 2 or 3.

Metastatic Breast Cancer

Herceptin is indicated:

  • In combination with paclitaxel for the first line treatment of HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer
  • As a single agent for treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer in patients who have received one or more chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease

Metastatic Gastric Cancer

Herceptin is indicated, in combination with cisplatin and capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil, for the treatment of patients with HER2 overexpressing metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, who have not received prior treatment for metastatic disease.


Boxed WARNINGS and Additional Important Safety Information

  • Herceptin administration can result in sub-clinical and clinical cardiac failure. The incidence and severity was highest in patients receiving Herceptin with anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens. In a pivotal adjuvant trial, one patient who developed CHF died of cardiomyopathy
  • Evaluate left ventricular function in all patients prior to and during treatment with Herceptin. Discontinue Herceptin treatment in patients receiving adjuvant therapy and withhold Herceptin in patients with metastatic disease for clinically significant decrease in left ventricular function
  • Herceptin administration can result in serious and fatal infusion reactions and pulmonary toxicity. Symptoms usually occur during or within 24 hours of Herceptin administration. Interrupt Herceptin infusion for dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Monitor patients until symptoms completely resolve. Discontinue Herceptin for anaphylaxis, angioedema, interstitial pneumonitis, or acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • Exposure to Herceptin during pregnancy can result in oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios sequence manifesting as pulmonary hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities, and neonatal death

Cardiomyopathy

  • Herceptin administration can result in sub-clinical and clinical cardiac failure. The incidence and severity was highest in patients receiving Herceptin with anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens. In a pivotal adjuvant breast cancer trial, one patient who developed CHF died of cardiomyopathy
  • Herceptin can cause left ventricular cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias, hypertension, disabling cardiac failure, cardiomyopathy, and cardiac death
  • Herceptin can also cause asymptomatic decline in LVEF
  • Discontinue Herceptin treatment in patients receiving adjuvant breast cancer therapy and withhold Herceptin in patients with metastatic disease for clinically significant decrease in left ventricular function

Cardiac Monitoring

  • Evaluate cardiac function prior to and during treatment. For adjuvant breast cancer therapy, also evaluate cardiac function after completion of Herceptin
  • Conduct thorough cardiac assessment, including history, physical examination, and determination of LVEF by echocardiogram or MUGA scan
  • Monitor frequently for decreased left ventricular function during and after Herceptin treatment
  • Monitor more frequently if Herceptin is withheld for significant left ventricular cardiac dysfunction

Infusion Reactions

  • Herceptin administration can result in serious and fatal infusion reactions
  • Symptoms usually occur during or within 24 hours of Herceptin administration
  • Interrupt Herceptin infusion for dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension
  • Monitor patients until symptoms completely resolve
  • Discontinue Herceptin for infusion reactions manifesting as anaphylaxis, angioedema, interstitial pneumonitis, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Strongly consider permanent discontinuation in all patients with severe infusion reactions
  • Infusion reactions consist of a symptom complex characterized by fever and chills, and on occasion include nausea, vomiting, pain (in some cases at tumor sites), headache, dizziness, dyspnea, hypotension, rash, and asthenia

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • Exposure to Herceptin during pregnancy can result in oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios sequence manifesting as pulmonary hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities, and neonatal death. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception
  • Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to the initiation of Herceptin
  • Advise pregnant women and females of reproductive potential that exposure to Herceptin during pregnancy or within 7 months prior to conception can result in fetal harm
  • Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 7 months following the last dose of Herceptin
  • Consider the developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding along with the mother’s clinical need for Herceptin treatment and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from Herceptin or from the underlying maternal condition
  • Encourage women who receive Herceptin during pregnancy or within 7 months prior to conception to enroll in the MotHER Pregnancy Registry by contacting 1-800-690-6720 or visiting http://www.motherpregnancyregistry.com/
  • If Herceptin is administered during pregnancy, or if a patient becomes pregnant while receiving Herceptin or within 7 months following the last dose of Herceptin, health care providers and patients should immediately report Herceptin exposure to Genentech at 1-888-835-2555

Pulmonary Toxicity

  • Herceptin administration can result in serious and fatal pulmonary toxicity, which includes dyspnea, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary infiltrates, pleural effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, pulmonary insufficiency and hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and pulmonary fibrosis. Such events can occur as sequelae of infusion reactions
  • Patients with symptomatic intrinsic lung disease or with extensive tumor involvement of the lungs, resulting in dyspnea at rest, appear to have more severe toxicity
  • Discontinue Herceptin in patients experiencing pulmonary toxicity

Exacerbation of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia

  • In randomized, controlled clinical trials, the per-patient incidences of NCI-CTC Grade 3-4 neutropenia and of febrile neutropenia were higher in patients receiving Herceptin in combination with myelosuppressive chemotherapy as compared to those who received chemotherapy alone. The incidence of septic death was similar among patients who received Herceptin and those who did not

HER2 Testing

  • Detection of HER2 protein overexpression is necessary for selection of patients appropriate for Herceptin therapy because these are the only patients studied and for whom benefit has been shown. Due to differences in tumor histopathology, use FDA-approved tests for the specific tumor type (breast or gastric/gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma) to assess HER2 overexpression and HER2 gene amplification. Tests should be performed by laboratories with demonstrated proficiency in the specific technology being utilized

Most Common Adverse Reactions

  • The most common adverse reactions associated with Herceptin in breast cancer were fever, nausea, vomiting, infusion reactions, diarrhea, infections, increased cough, headache, fatigue, dyspnea, rash, neutropenia, anemia, and myalgia
  • The most common adverse reactions associated with Herceptin in metastatic gastric cancer were neutropenia, diarrhea, fatigue, anemia, stomatitis, weight loss, upper respiratory tract infections, fever, thrombocytopenia, mucosal inflammation, nasopharyngitis, and dysgeusia

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see additional select Important Safety Information throughout, and the accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS.

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