3 approved indications. 1 legacy.1

7 Phase II or III clinical trials

7 Phase II or III clinical trials evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of Herceptin1,6-15

20+ years on the market

20+ years on the market since approval of first indication in 19984

 2.3 million patients

Based on a report, 2.3 million patients worldwide were treated with Herceptin to date16

Adjuvant Breast Cancer1

Herceptin is indicated for adjuvant treatment of HER2-overexpressing node-positive or node-negative (ER/PR-negative or with one high-risk feature*) breast cancer:

  • As part of a treatment regimen containing doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and either paclitaxel or docetaxel
  • With docetaxel and carboplatin
  • As a single agent following multi-modality anthracycline-based therapy

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Herceptin.

*High-risk is defined as ER/PR-positive with one of the following features: tumor size >2 cm, age <35 years, or tumor grade 2 or 3.

Herceptin was studied as adjuvant treatment in 4 pivotal trials involving more than 10,000 people with HER2+ breast cancer.1

The primary endpoint was DFS, defined as the time from randomization to recurrence, occurrence of contralateral breast cancer, other second primary cancer, or death.

 

Herceptin was studied in 4 pivotal trials involving more than 10,000 people. The primary endpoint was DFS

Studies in adjuvant breast cancer

Herceptin studies 1-2: treatment arms in joint analysis of NSABP B-31 and NCCTG N9831

In NCCTG N9831, there was a sequential third arm that was not analyzed as part of the joint analysis. The data from both arms in Study 1 and two of the three study arms in Study 2 were pooled for efficacy analyses.7
AC=doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide, TH=paclitaxel plus Herceptin, T=paclitaxel.

Study summary1,6-8

  • An analysis of 3,752 patients from 2 multicenter, randomized, Phase III clinical trials conducted in patients with early breast cancer to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding 1 year of Herceptin to adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of HER2+ early breast cancer

Primary endpoint1

  • The primary endpoint of the joint analysis was DFS, defined as time from randomization to recurrence, to occurrence of contralateral breast cancer, other second primary cancer, or death

The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) of Herceptin in adjuvant breast cancer are headache, diarrhea, nausea, and chills.1

Herceptin treatment was permanently discontinued in patients who developed congestive heart failure, or persistent/recurrent LVEF decline. Radiation therapy, if administered, was initiated after the completion of chemotherapy. Patients with ER+ and/or PR+ tumors received hormonal therapy (as appropriate).1

Herceptin study 3: treatment arms Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) breast cancer trial

Study summary1,9

  • An international, multicenter, randomized, Phase III, open-label, multi-modality controlled clinical trial was conducted in 5081 patients with early breast cancer to evaluate the effect of 1 and 2 years of every 3-week Herceptin treatment vs observation in the adjuvant treatment of HER2+ breast cancer

Primary endpoint1

  • The main outcome measure was DFS

The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) of Herceptin in adjuvant breast cancer are headache, diarrhea, nausea, and chills.1

Patients with ER+ and/or PR+ disease received systemic adjuvant hormonal therapy at investigator discretion.1

Herceptin study 4: treatment arms BCIRG 006 trial in adjuvant breast cancer

 

TCH=docetaxel and carboplatin plus Herceptin, AC=doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide, TH=docetaxel plus Herceptin, T=docetaxel.

Study summary1,10,11

  • An international, randomized, Phase III clinical trial was conducted in 3222 patients with early breast cancer to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding 1 year of Herceptin to both an anthracycline-based and a non-anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy regimen

Primary endpoint1

  • The main outcome measure was DFS

The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) of Herceptin in adjuvant breast cancer are headache, diarrhea, nausea, and chills.1

Patients with ER+ and/or PR+ disease received systemic adjuvant hormonal therapy at investigator discretion.1

Metastatic Breast Cancer1

Herceptin is indicated:

  • In combination with paclitaxel for the first-line treatment of HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer
  • As a single agent for treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer in patients who have received one or more chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Herceptin.

Herceptin was studied in 2 pivotal trials involving more than 600 people with HER2+ metastatic breast cancer.1

The primary endpoint was median TTP in one trial and ORR in the other trial.

 

Herceptin was studied in 2 pivotal trials of patients involving more than 600 people with metastatic breast cancer. The primary endpoint was median TTP in one trial and ORR in the other trial.

Studies in metastatic breast cancer

Herceptin study 5: treatment arms in H0648g trial in metastatic breast cancer

 

 

Chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel (175 mg/m2 over 3 hours every 21 days for at least 6 cycles); for all other patients, chemotherapy consisted of anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide (AC: doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 or epirubicin 75 mg/m2 plus 600 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide every 21 days for 6 cycles).1

Study summary1,12,13

  • An international, randomized, Phase III, open-label, clinical trial was conducted in 469 patients with metastatic breast cancer evaluating the safety and efficacy of Herceptin monotherapy in treatment of women with metastatic breast cancer who had not previously been treated with chemotherapy for their metastatic disease

Primary endpoint1

  • The primary endpoint was median TTP

The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) of Herceptin in metastatic breast cancer are fever, chills, headache, infection, congestive heart failure, insomnia, cough, and rash.1

Herceptin study 6: open-label, single-arm M77001 trial in metastatic breast cancer

Study summary1,14

  • An international, Phase II, open-label, single-arm clinical trial was conducted in 222 patients with metastatic breast cancer to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Herceptin monotherapy in people with HER2 overexpressing metastatic breast cancer who had relapsed following 1 or 2 prior chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease

Primary endpoint1

  • The main outcome measure was ORR, defined as the proportion of patients who have a partial or complete response to therapy; it does not include stable disease and is a direct measure of drug tumoricidal activity

The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) of Herceptin in metastatic breast cancer are fever, chills, headache, infection, congestive heart failure, insomnia, cough, and rash.1

Metastatic Gastric/GEJ Cancer1

Herceptin is indicated, in combination with cisplatin and capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil, for the treatment of patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma who have not received prior treatment for metastatic disease.

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Herceptin.

Herceptin was studied in 1 pivotal trial involving 594 people with HER2+ metastatic gastric cancer.1

The primary endpoint was OS.

 

Herceptin was studied in 1 pivotal trial involving 594 people. The primary endpoint was OS.

Studies in metastatic gastric cancer

Herceptin study 7: treatment arms in ToGA trial in metastatic gastric cancer

FC=fluoropyrimidine plus cisplatin, H=Herceptin.

Study summary1,15

  • An international, randomized, Phase III, open-label clinical trial was conducted in 594 patients with metastatic gastric cancer to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Herceptin in combination with cisplatin and a fluoropyrimidine in patients previously untreated for metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma

Primary endpoint1

  • The main outcome measure was OS

The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) of Herceptin in metastatic gastric cancer are neutropenia, diarrhea, fatigue, anemia, stomatitis, weight loss, upper respiratory tract infections, fever, thrombocytopenia, mucosal inflammation, nasopharyngitis, and dysgeusia.1

Across approved indications, Herceptin has been used to treat more than 2.3 million patients to date16

Drug utilization assumptions were considered in order to calculate the number of patients exposed to Herceptin by indication worldwide, including US and Japan.

Patients treated is based on the PBRER report of patient exposure, which was calculated based on the global total milligram volume sales divided by the average dose per patient per year, based on US approved indications.

Average dose per patient was based on an average patient weight multiplied by mean dose divided by average treatment duration. Assumption of patient exposures from PBRER report may not necessarily correspond to a unique patient.

Excluding Japan, the average body weight was sourced from internal data sources ex-US and ranged between 65-75 kg in the US. Average dose was based on the approved dose of each indication. Note: Some dose interruptions may have been accounted for per clinician discretion. In Japan, total dose for each given indication was sourced from sales assumption data during that year and dose per patient per indication was sourced from 2014 sales assumption data.

PBRER=Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report.

 

Learn more about Herceptin dosing and administration.

See details about Genentech’s commitment to advocating for patient access and physician choice.

Herceptin: Indications

Adjuvant Breast Cancer

Herceptin is indicated for adjuvant treatment of HER2-overexpressing node-positive or node-negative (ER/PR-negative or with one high-risk feature*) breast cancer:

  • As part of a treatment regimen containing doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and either paclitaxel or docetaxel
  • With docetaxel and carboplatin
  • As a single agent following multi-modality anthracycline-based therapy

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Herceptin
*High-risk is defined as ER/PR-positive with one of the following features: tumor size >2 cm, age <35 years, or tumor grade 2 or 3.

Metastatic Breast Cancer

Herceptin is indicated:

  • In combination with paclitaxel for the first line treatment of HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer
  • As a single agent for treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer in patients who have received one or more chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Herceptin

Metastatic Gastric Cancer

Herceptin is indicated, in combination with cisplatin and capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil, for the treatment of patients with HER2 overexpressing metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, who have not received prior treatment for metastatic disease.

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Herceptin

 

Herceptin HYLECTA: Indications

Adjuvant Breast Cancer

HERCEPTIN HYLECTA (trastuzumab and hyaluronidase-oysk) is indicated for adjuvant treatment of adults with HER2-overexpressing node-positive or node-negative (ER/PR-negative or with one high-risk feature*) breast cancer:

  • As part of a treatment regimen containing doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and either paclitaxel or docetaxel
  • With docetaxel and carboplatin
  • As a single agent following multi-modality anthracycline-based therapy

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for trastuzumab
*High-risk is defined as ER/PR-positive with one of the following features: tumor size >2 cm, age <35 years, or tumor grade 2 or 3.

Metastatic Breast Cancer

HERCEPTIN HYLECTA is indicated in adults:

  • In combination with paclitaxel for the first line treatment of HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer
  • As a single agent for treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer in patients who have received one or more chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for trastuzumab

Herceptin: Boxed WARNINGS and Additional Important Safety Information

Cardiomyopathy

  • Herceptin administration can result in sub-clinical and clinical cardiac failure. The incidence and severity was highest in patients receiving Herceptin with anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens.
  • Evaluate left ventricular function in all patients prior to and during treatment with Herceptin. Discontinue Herceptin treatment in patients receiving adjuvant therapy and withhold Herceptin in patients with metastatic disease for clinically significant decrease in left ventricular function

Infusion Reactions; Pulmonary Toxicity

  • Herceptin administration can result in serious and fatal infusion reactions and pulmonary toxicity. Symptoms usually occur during or within 24 hours of Herceptin administration.  Interrupt Herceptin infusion for dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Monitor patients until symptoms completely resolve. Discontinue Herceptin for anaphylaxis, angioedema, interstitial pneumonitis, or acute respiratory distress syndrome

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • Exposure to Herceptin during pregnancy can result in oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios sequence manifesting as pulmonary hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities, and neonatal death. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception

Cardiomyopathy

  • Herceptin administration can result in sub-clinical and clinical cardiac failure. The incidence and severity was highest in patients receiving Herceptin with anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens. In a pivotal adjuvant trial, one patient who developed CHF died of cardiomyopathy
  • Herceptin can cause left ventricular cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias, hypertension, disabling cardiac failure, cardiomyopathy, and cardiac death
  • Herceptin can also cause asymptomatic decline in LVEF
  • Discontinue Herceptin treatment in patients receiving adjuvant therapy and withhold Herceptin in patients with metastatic disease for clinically significant decrease in left ventricular function

Cardiac Monitoring

  • Evaluate cardiac function prior to and during treatment. For adjuvant breast cancer therapy, also evaluate cardiac function after completion of Herceptin
  • Conduct thorough cardiac assessment, including history, physical examination, and determination of LVEF by echocardiogram or MUGA scan
  • Monitor frequently for decreased left ventricular function during and after Herceptin treatment
  • Monitor more frequently if Herceptin is withheld for significant left ventricular cardiac dysfunction

Infusion Reactions

  • Herceptin administration can result in serious and fatal infusion reactions
  • Symptoms usually occur during or within 24 hours of Herceptin administration
  • Interrupt Herceptin infusion for dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension
  • Monitor patients until symptoms completely resolve
  • Discontinue Herceptin for infusion reactions manifesting as anaphylaxis, angioedema, interstitial pneumonitis, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Strongly consider permanent discontinuation in all patients with severe infusion reactions
  • Infusion reactions consist of a symptom complex characterized by fever and chills, and on occasion include nausea, vomiting, pain (in some cases at tumor sites), headache, dizziness, dyspnea, hypotension, rash, and asthenia

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • Exposure to Herceptin during pregnancy can result in oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios sequence manifesting as pulmonary hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities, and neonatal death. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception
  • Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to the initiation of Herceptin
  • Advise pregnant women and females of reproductive potential that exposure to Herceptin during pregnancy or within 7 months prior to conception can result in fetal harm
  • Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 7 months following the last dose of Herceptin
  • Consider the developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding along with the mother’s clinical need for Herceptin treatment and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from Herceptin or from the underlying maternal condition
  • If Herceptin is administered during pregnancy, or if a patient becomes pregnant while receiving Herceptin or within 7 months following the last dose of Herceptin, health care providers and patients should immediately report Herceptin exposure to Genentech at 1-888-835-2555

Pulmonary Toxicity

  • Herceptin administration can result in serious and fatal pulmonary toxicity, which includes dyspnea, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary infiltrates, pleural effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, pulmonary insufficiency and hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and pulmonary fibrosis. Such events can occur as sequelae of infusion reactions
  • Patients with symptomatic intrinsic lung disease or with extensive tumor involvement of the lungs, resulting in dyspnea at rest, appear to have more severe toxicity
  • Discontinue Herceptin in patients experiencing pulmonary toxicity

Exacerbation of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia

  • In randomized, controlled clinical trials, the per-patient incidences of NCI-CTC Grade 3-4 neutropenia and of febrile neutropenia were higher in patients receiving Herceptin in combination with myelosuppressive chemotherapy as compared to those who received chemotherapy alone. The incidence of septic death was similar among patients who received Herceptin and those who did not

Most Common Adverse Reactions

  • The most common adverse reactions associated with Herceptin in breast cancer were fever, nausea, vomiting, infusion reactions, diarrhea, infections, increased cough, headache, fatigue, dyspnea, rash, neutropenia, anemia, and myalgia
  • The most common adverse reactions associated with Herceptin in metastatic gastric cancer were neutropenia, diarrhea, fatigue, anemia, stomatitis, weight loss, upper respiratory tract infections, fever, thrombocytopenia, mucosal inflammation, nasopharyngitis, and dysgeusia

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see additional select Important Safety Information throughout, and the accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS.

 

Herceptin HYLECTA: BOXED WARNINGS and Additional Important Safety Information

Cardiomyopathy

  • HERCEPTIN HYLECTA administration can result in sub-clinical and clinical cardiac failure. The incidence and severity was highest in patients receiving HERCEPTIN HYLECTA with anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens.
  • Evaluate left ventricular function in all patients prior to and during treatment with HERCEPTIN HYLECTA. Discontinue HERCEPTIN HYLECTA treatment in patients receiving adjuvant therapy and withhold HERCEPTIN HYLECTA in patients with metastatic disease for clinically significant decrease in left ventricular function

Pulmonary Toxicity

  • HERCEPTIN HYLECTA administration can result in serious and fatal pulmonary toxicity. Symptoms usually occur during or within 24 hours of HERCEPTIN HYLECTA administration. Discontinue HERCEPTIN HYLECTA for anaphylaxis, angioedema, interstitial pneumonitis, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Monitor patients until symptoms completely resolve

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • Exposure to HERCEPTIN HYLECTA during pregnancy can result in oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios sequence manifesting as pulmonary hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities, and neonatal death. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception

Cardiomyopathy

  • HERCEPTIN HYLECTA administration can result in sub-clinical and clinical cardiac failure. The incidence and severity was highest in patients receiving HERCEPTIN HYLECTA with anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens. In a pivotal adjuvant breast cancer trial of intravenous trastuzumab, one patient who developed CHF died of cardiomyopathy
  • HERCEPTIN HYLECTA can cause left ventricular cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias, hypertension, disabling cardiac failure, cardiomyopathy, and cardiac death
  • HERCEPTIN HYLECTA can also cause asymptomatic decline in LVEF
  • Discontinue HERCEPTIN HYLECTA treatment in patients receiving adjuvant breast cancer therapy and withhold HERCEPTIN HYLECTA in patients with metastatic disease for clinically significant decrease in left ventricular function

Cardiac Monitoring

  • Evaluate cardiac function prior to and during treatment
  • Conduct thorough cardiac assessment, including history, physical examination, and determination of LVEF by echocardiogram or MUGA scan
  • Monitor frequently for decreased left ventricular function during and after HERCEPTIN HYLECTA treatment
  • Monitor more frequently if HERCEPTIN HYLECTA is withheld for significant left ventricular cardiac dysfunction

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • Exposure to HERCEPTIN HYLECTA during pregnancy can result in oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios sequence manifesting as pulmonary hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities, and neonatal death. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception
  • Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to the initiation of HERCEPTIN HYLECTA
  • Advise pregnant women and females of reproductive potential that exposure to HERCEPTIN HYLECTA during pregnancy or within 7 months prior to conception can result in fetal harm
  • Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 7 months following the last dose of HERCEPTIN HYLECTA
  • Consider the developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding along with the mother’s clinical need for HERCEPTIN HYLECTA treatment and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from HERCEPTIN HYLECTA or from the underlying maternal condition
  • If HERCEPTIN HYLECTA is administered during pregnancy, or if a patient becomes pregnant while receiving HERCEPTIN HYLECTA or within 7 months following the last dose of HERCEPTIN HYLECTA, health care providers and patients should immediately report HERCEPTIN HYLECTA exposure to Genentech at 1-888-835-2555

Pulmonary Toxicity

  • HERCEPTIN HYLECTA administration can result in serious and fatal pulmonary toxicity, which includes dyspnea, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary infiltrates, pleural effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, pulmonary insufficiency and hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Patients with symptomatic intrinsic lung disease or with extensive tumor involvement of the lungs, resulting in dyspnea at rest, appear to have more severe toxicity
  • Discontinue HERCEPTIN HYLECTA in patients experiencing pulmonary toxicity

Exacerbation of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia

  • In randomized, controlled clinical trials with intravenous trastuzumab, the per-patient incidences of NCI-CTC Grade 3-4 neutropenia and of febrile neutropenia were higher in patients receiving trastuzumab in combination with myelosuppressive chemotherapy as compared to those who received chemotherapy alone. The incidence of septic death was similar among patients who received trastuzumab and those who did not

Hypersensitivity and Administration-Related Reactions

  • Severe administration-related reactions (ARRs), including hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis, have been reported with HERCEPTIN HYLECTA. Patients experiencing dyspnea at rest due to complications of advanced malignancy and comorbidities may be at increased risk of a severe or of a fatal ARR.
  • In the HannaH and SafeHER trials, 9% and 4.2% of patients experienced Grade 1-4 hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis, respectively. Grade 3-4 hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions occurred in 1% and <1% of the patients treated with HERCEPTIN HYLECTA, respectively. In the SafeHER trial, 2 patients required permanent treatment discontinuation with HERCEPTIN HYLECTA; 1 patient due to a hypersensitivity reaction and 1 patient due to anaphylaxis. Serious and fatal reactions have been reported after treatment with intravenous trastuzumab products
  • Closely monitor patients for systemic hypersensitivity reactions, especially during the first administration. Permanently discontinue HERCEPTIN HYLECTA in patients who experience anaphylaxis or severe hypersensitivity reactions. Medications to treat such reactions, as well as emergency equipment, should be available for immediate use. For patients experiencing reversible Grade 1 or 2 hypersensitivity reactions, consider pre-medication with an analgesic, antipyretic, or an antihistamine prior to re-administration of HERCEPTIN HYLECTA

Most Common Adverse Reactions
Adjuvant Breast Cancer

  • Most common adverse reactions for HERCEPTIN HYLECTA are fatigue, arthralgia, diarrhea, injection site reaction, upper respiratory tract infection, rash, myalgia, nausea, headache, edema, flushing, pyrexia, cough, and pain in extremity.

Metastatic Breast Cancer (based on intravenous trastuzumab)

  • Most common adverse reactions are fever, chills, headache, infection, congestive heart failure, insomnia, cough, and rash.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 800–FDA–1088 or http://www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at 1–888–835–2555.

Please see additional select Important Safety Information throughout, and the accompanying full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNINGS.

    • Herceptin Prescribing Information. Genentech, Inc. February 2021.

      Herceptin Prescribing Information. Genentech, Inc. February 2021.

    • Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Breast Cancer V.1.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Accessed June 13, 2019. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.

      Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Breast Cancer V.1.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Accessed June 13, 2019. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.

    • Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Gastric Cancer V.2.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Accessed June 13, 2019. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.

      Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Gastric Cancer V.2.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Accessed June 13, 2019. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.

    • FDA Approval Letter. Herceptin. September 25, 1998. At: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/appletter/1998/trasgen092598L.pdf. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      FDA Approval Letter. Herceptin. September 25, 1998. At: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/appletter/1998/trasgen092598L.pdf. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Herceptin HYLECTA Prescribing Information. Genentech, Inc. February 2019.

      Herceptin HYLECTA Prescribing Information. Genentech, Inc. February 2019.

    • Romond EH, Perez EA, Bryant J, et al; from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) and the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG). Trastuzumab plus adjuvant chemotherapy for operable HER2-positive breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 2005;353(16):1673-1684. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa052122. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Romond EH, Perez EA, Bryant J, et al; from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) and the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG). Trastuzumab plus adjuvant chemotherapy for operable HER2-positive breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 2005;353(16):1673-1684. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa052122. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • ClinicalTrials.gov. Doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide plus paclitaxel with or without trastuzumab in treating women with node-positive breast cancer that overexpresses HER2. NCT00004067 updated January 15, 2019. At: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00004067. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      ClinicalTrials.gov. Doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide plus paclitaxel with or without trastuzumab in treating women with node-positive breast cancer that overexpresses HER2. NCT00004067 updated January 15, 2019. At: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00004067. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • ClinicalTrials.gov. Doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel with or without trastuzumab in treating women with HER2-positive node-positive or high-risk node-negative breast cancer. NCT00005970 updated June 4, 2019. At: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00005970. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      ClinicalTrials.gov. Doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel with or without trastuzumab in treating women with HER2-positive node-positive or high-risk node-negative breast cancer. NCT00005970 updated June 4, 2019. At: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00005970. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Piccart-Gebhart MJ, Procter M, Leyland-Jones B, et al; for the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) Trial Study Team. Trastuzumab after adjuvant chemotherapy in HER2-positive breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 2005;353(16):1659-1672. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa052306. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Piccart-Gebhart MJ, Procter M, Leyland-Jones B, et al; for the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) Trial Study Team. Trastuzumab after adjuvant chemotherapy in HER2-positive breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 2005;353(16):1659-1672. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa052306. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Slamon D, Eiermann W, Robert N, et al; for the Breast Cancer International Research Group (BCIRG). Adjuvant trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 2011;365(14):1273-1283. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0910383. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Slamon D, Eiermann W, Robert N, et al; for the Breast Cancer International Research Group (BCIRG). Adjuvant trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 2011;365(14):1273-1283. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0910383. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • ClinicalTrials.gov. Combination chemotherapy with or without trastuzumab in treating women with breast cancer. NCT00021255 updated November 15, 2016. At: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00021255. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      ClinicalTrials.gov. Combination chemotherapy with or without trastuzumab in treating women with breast cancer. NCT00021255 updated November 15, 2016. At: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00021255. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Jackisch C. HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer: optimizing trastuzumab-based therapy. Oncologist. 2006;11(suppl 1):34-41. At: http://theoncologist.alphamedpress.org/content/11/suppl_1/34.full.pdf+html. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Jackisch C. HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer: optimizing trastuzumab-based therapy. Oncologist. 2006;11(suppl 1):34-41. At: http://theoncologist.alphamedpress.org/content/11/suppl_1/34.full.pdf+html. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Slamon DJ, Leyland-Jones B, Shak S, et al. Use of chemotherapy plus a monoclonal antibody against HER2 for metastatic breast cancer that overexpresses HER2. N Engl J Med. 2001;344(11):783-792. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM200103153441101. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Slamon DJ, Leyland-Jones B, Shak S, et al. Use of chemotherapy plus a monoclonal antibody against HER2 for metastatic breast cancer that overexpresses HER2. N Engl J Med. 2001;344(11):783-792. At: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM200103153441101. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Marty M, Cognetti F, Maraninchi D, et al; for the M77001 Study Group. Randomized Phase II trial of the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab combined with docetaxel in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–positive metastatic breast cancer administered as first-line treatment: the M77001 Study Group. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23(19):4265-4274. At: https://ascopubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1200/JCO.2005.04.173. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Marty M, Cognetti F, Maraninchi D, et al; for the M77001 Study Group. Randomized Phase II trial of the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab combined with docetaxel in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–positive metastatic breast cancer administered as first-line treatment: the M77001 Study Group. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23(19):4265-4274. At: https://ascopubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1200/JCO.2005.04.173. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Bang Y-J, Van Cutsem E, Feyereislova A, et al; for the ToGA Trial Investigators. Trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone for treatment of HER2-positive advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer (ToGA): a phase 3, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2010;376(9742):687-697. At: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61121-X/fulltext. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Bang Y-J, Van Cutsem E, Feyereislova A, et al; for the ToGA Trial Investigators. Trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone for treatment of HER2-positive advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer (ToGA): a phase 3, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2010;376(9742):687-697. At: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61121-X/fulltext. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Data on file. Genentech, Inc.

      Data on file. Genentech, Inc.

    • Witton CJ, Reeves JR, Going JJ, Cooke TG, Bartlett JMS. Expression of the HER1-4 family of receptor tyrosine kinases in breast cancer. J Pathol. 2003;200(3):290-297. At: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/path.1370. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Witton CJ, Reeves JR, Going JJ, Cooke TG, Bartlett JMS. Expression of the HER1-4 family of receptor tyrosine kinases in breast cancer. J Pathol. 2003;200(3):290-297. At: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/path.1370. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Valabrega G, Montemurro F, Aglietta M. Trastuzumab: mechanism of action, resistance and future perspectives in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. Ann Oncol. 2007;18(6):977-984. At: https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article/18/6/977/241334. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Valabrega G, Montemurro F, Aglietta M. Trastuzumab: mechanism of action, resistance and future perspectives in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. Ann Oncol. 2007;18(6):977-984. At: https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article/18/6/977/241334. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • Molina MA, Codony-Servat J, Albanell J, Rojo F, Arribas J, Baselga J. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized anti-HER2 receptor monoclonal antibody, inhibits basal and activated HER2 ectodomain cleavage in breast cancer cells. Cancer Res. 2001;61(12):4744-4749. At: http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/61/12/4744.full-text.pdf. Accessed June 24, 2019.

      Molina MA, Codony-Servat J, Albanell J, Rojo F, Arribas J, Baselga J. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized anti-HER2 receptor monoclonal antibody, inhibits basal and activated HER2 ectodomain cleavage in breast cancer cells. Cancer Res. 2001;61(12):4744-4749. At: http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/61/12/4744.full-text.pdf. Accessed June 24, 2019.

    • MMIT Analysis.

      MMIT Analysis.

    • IQVIA Plantrak Corticosteroid Data.

      IQVIA Plantrak Corticosteroid Data.

    • HLI lives database.

      HLI lives database.